Mr. Walter J. Sommerfelt was pointing at Bienna, and I realized he was awarding her “Best in Breed!” For the fifth time!

“It’s a lot of needing Klonopin and Xanaz,” Murray continued. “I’m gonna go to the hotel, and have a early dinner, and take a couple drinks, and go to sleep. I gotta get up early, I have to go to Pittsburgh to pick something up, then I have to drive to North Carolina and pick up two clients before we go back to Alabama.”

I asked if the clients were dogs. Murray said they were. I pet Michael one last time, and then he and Murray left the ring. He smiled, blissfully unaware that he hadn’t won, because he is a dog.

Then I turned my attention back to Bienna, who Mclaughlin had already paraded around. Mr. Walter J. Sommerfelt was pointing at Bienna, and I realized he was awarding her “Best in Breed!” For the fifth time!

The accepted maxim is that tour golfers don’t retire; they show up at fewer and fewer events, struggling more and more, until it’s time to move to the Champions Tour. Longtime Woods watchers cannot imagine Tiger, whose mantra since “Hello world” has been “in it to win it,” willing to join the over-50 gang or become more of a rubbernecker attraction than he’s already become, almost to the point where fans and media show up to see how much of a car wreck his next outing will be.

Whether Woods makes a statement announcing his retirement, or continues shuffling and grimacing around golf courses in depressing, failed attempts to make cuts for the next however many weeks, months, years, it’s pretty clear to those watching him try to recapture the long-gone glory days of the playing career of the greatest golfer of his generation, if not all time, is over.

“He might play another 10 years, but I just don’t see it if he doesn’t change his golf swing.” Brandel Chamblee on Tiger Woods injuries

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