Bill Belichick mumbles great response to QB question

Let’s get one thing straight: Even if Jimmy Garoppolo throws for 2,000 yards, 20 touchdowns with a perfect passer rating in his four starts, Tom Brady will be under center Week 5 against the Cleveland Browns.

Jake Long doesn’t sign injury waiver, won’t join Ravens

Jake Long will not join the Baltimore Ravens.

After speaking with general manager Tom Telesco on Friday, Wyche was left with the belief that this staredown will not end until Bosa tells his agent that it’s time to play football.

Here’s what else we learned from Friday’s action in training camps around the league:

The dotted line

1. Andre Johnson’s AFC South odyssey now includes Nashville. The Titans signed the 35-year-old receiver ostensibly to set a professional example for the young players, including enigmatic wideout Dorial Green-Beckham. With DGB, Kendall Wright, Rishard Matthews and rookie Tajae Sharpe ticketed for the Week 1 roster, Johnson could be competing with Harry Douglas and Justin Hunter for the final spot at wide receiver.

2. Darius Slay might not be a household name, but he emerged as a Pro Bowl-caliber cornerback in 2015. Now the fourth-year star is paid like it. Slay inked a four-year, $48 million deal with $23.1 million guaranteed. He and Ziggy Ansah are Detroit’s building blocks on defense.

3. In the span of three months, Darren Sproles has gone from trade candidate to roster mainstay in Philadelphia. The Eagles signed the 33-year-old to a one-year, $4 million extension that will keep the passing-down specialist and kick returner onboard through the 2017 season.

Now that Ryan Fitzpatrick and the Jets have found common ground, the Chargers’ contract stalemate with first-round draft pick Joey Bosa looms as the tedious business story threatens to overshadow the on-field show in training camp.

Standing firm on upfront bonus money and offset contract language, Bosa did not report with his teammates Friday, per NFL Media’s Steve Wyche.

Bosa is pushing for all of his bonus money to be paid in full, per Wyche, while the team insists on paying in two installments.

The Bolts want to be consistent about how they do business. They are loath to set a precedent, not only in San Diego but also for the rest of the league.

In the meantime, both sides are entrenching.

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *